Image: Anna Louise Richardson, What am I gathering (crow), 2022, charcoal on cement fibreboard, 132 x 90cm. Image courtesy the artist

A collaborative exhibition by Anna Louise Richardson and Abdul-Rahman Abdullah.

Still Watching embodies different experiences and perceptions of mutual observation in the natural world. Embracing both the magical thinking of childhood and the pragmatism of raising a young family in a rural environment, Anna Louise Richardson and Abdul-Rahman Abdullah articulate a personal lore, voicing their relationships with other creatures and the mythic qualities of the worlds we occupy.

Still Watching is a reflection of the artists’ shared experiences of vigilance within a domestic geography shadowed by the rituals of life and death, love and loss, memory and myth.

Still Watching will immerse Fremantle Arts Centre’s main gallery in a darkly psychological landscape that posits the questions who is watching and who is being watched?

Watching was originally developed and realised by Anna Louise Richardson and Abdul-Rahman Abdullah through the commissions program at West Space, 2022, Both Watching and Still Watching have received meaningful support from Regional Arts WA through the Regional Artist Fellowship.

Curated by Glenn Iseger-Pilkington, with the artists

Marawar-ak | From the West

This exhibition is part of Marawar-ak | From the West: Contemporary Art from Western Australia,  a celebration of Western Australian art which showcases artists working across design, animation, sculpture, drawing and installation practices.

This exhibition season is inspired by the return of cooling winds towards the end of the year, during Kambarang, Birak and Bunuru, which bring relief at the end of hot summer days.

The exhibitions, feature works of art that survey the lands we live upon, explore the ways we make meaning of the world and others that transport us to imaginary worlds. They celebrate our artists and our place in the world and place focus on stories borne from our vast State.

Comprised of four independent exhibitions, Marawar-ak presents stories of regional and remote life, love, family, grief, choice, sacrifice, alongside works that map geography and memory.