Image: Claire Robertson, Far From Here, 2016, still from video. Image courtesy of the artist

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Claire Robertson with her installation Far From Here, 2016. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Image: Far From Here opening night. Photo by Jessica Wyld

Returning to the remains of the temporary mining camp located 1,651km from Perth that her family called home in the 1980s, video artist Claire Robertson transports her audience into the vast landscape of the WA outback in Far From Here.

A video installation of cinematic proportions, Robertson leads the viewer through large-scale, multi-channel projections that capture uninhabited fly-in fly-out mining camps of the Pilbara Region. Awaiting their imminent removal, these demountable villages sit in stark contrast with an endless horizon balanced on the edge of reality.

Far From Here explores what it means to experience a place at a distance. Examining prevailing colonial relationships to the landscape and what it really means to ‘inhabit place’, Robertson questions ‘Are we really here?’

With a haunting sound design by acclaimed WA composer Tilman Robinson, Robertson embarks on a visually stunning work, vast in scale and scope. Far From Here was originally developed for Next Wave Festival 2016.

Claire talks about growing up on a mining camp on the FAC blog